Raising other concerns in the Peninsula Medical School (BMBS)

Raising concerns

As a medical student, member of staff, or as someone involved in teaching you may have concerns. 

Many concerns can be managed through senior faculty members such as Line Managers, Community and Hospital Sub-Deans, Senior Academic Tutors, Heads of School, Associate Deans or Professionalism Lead. 

However, the raising concerns procedure provides an individual with a route for raising serious concerns related to patient safety or academic or professional malpractice.

Staff and student members of the University may use this raising concerns procedure to raise either a concern about academic or professional malpractice or a concern about patient safety or compromised care. 

We recognise that an important role of our clinical curricula is to provide students with the skills and confidence to raise concerns, particularly those which impact on patient safety and care. 

Where can I access full details of the policy?

Visit the faculty policies page where you can find the Raising Concerns policy and procedure alongside the Raising Concerns process flowchart.

Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry policies

When should the raising concerns procedure be used?

All members of the University are free to make a complaint, pursue a grievance or highlight an instance of possible misconduct in the University or the activities of its staff at the earliest opportunity. 

Such issues may be dealt with through the normal channels of communication (via Heads of School or Directorate), and/or through existing University procedures such as the University complaints or grievance procedures.

However, the University acknowledges that there may be instances in which members of the University may feel that to use those processes may in some way jeopardise their own position within the institution, or that the normal channels would be inappropriate given the nature of the concern. 

Therefore members of the University may use this raising concerns procedure to raise either a concern about academic or professional malpractice or a concern about patient safety or compromised care. 

We recognise that an important role of our clinical curricula is to provide students with the skills and confidence to raise concerns, particularly those which impact on patient safety and care, both as students and future clinicians.

Further reading

Medical students: Professional Values and Fitness to Practise. GMC and Medical Schools Council Guidance 2016.

Raising and acting on concerns about patient safety. GMC Guidance 2012.

Openness and honesty when things go wrong: The professional duty of candour. GMC Guidance 2015.

Good medical practice. GMC Guidance 2014.