School of Law, Criminology and Government

BSc (Hons) Criminology and Criminal Justice Studies with International Relations

Put your incisive mind and probing skills to best use as a decision-maker, policy developer or in assisting in the treatment of offenders. This course offers you a world-class toolkit of analytical and practical skills to examine how and why people commit crime and how we, as a society, deal with criminality. Whether it’s probation, policing, youth justice, community safety, victim services, or international relations you’ll graduate primed to embark on your future career path.

BSc (Hons) Criminology and Criminal Justice with International Relations

We’re excited to announce that from September 2020 this course will be named BSc (Hons) Criminology and Criminal Justice with International Relations.

Key features

  • Make a difference – draw on our inter-disciplinary approach to study, with a focus on contemporary issues, to gain real insight into the nature of crime, the workings of the criminal justice system and the society around you and equip yourself with the skills to bring about change.
  • Boost your employability and gain hands-on experience by volunteering with local and national criminal justice agencies.
  • Equip yourself with in-demand skills – our graduates are highly sought after by a range of criminal justice agencies, including the police, probation, prison and youth justice services. 
  • Open doors to a career in the private, public or third sector – highly transferable skills mean our students find career opportunities in a diverse range of settings.

Course details

  • Year 1
  • In your first year, you’ll lay the foundations for your studies, exploring various perspectives on criminology and examining theories on the causes of crime and deviance. You’ll develop an understanding of the criminal justice process in England and Wales, as well as gaining a grounding in criminal justice research, examining crime in the context of economic, political and social frameworks, and grasping the key processes that have shaped the evolution of international relations.

    Core modules
    • CCJS1112 Criminology and Crime Problems

      This module introduces students to the subject of criminology. It emphasises criminology's multi-disciplinary and the different perspectives, methods and sources of information that it draws upon in developing theories about the different causes and problematizations of crime and deviance.

    • CCJS1115 Being a Criminologist

      The module provides students with a grounding in the concepts, techniques, methods and skills necessary for developing a criminological analysis to crime and justice. Students will analyse key contemporary examples of crime, justice and social issues pertinent at the time which could include; murder, the war on drugs, police brutality and injustice within the courts. Students will assess the strengths and weakness of criminological and methodological approaches to understanding these examples.

    • CCJS1116 Crime in Context

      This module provides students with an introduction to key questions in the study of criminology and criminal justice, providing them with necessary skills to be a successful and reflexive student of criminology. The module places criminology in the context of economic, political and social interpretative frameworks, and contributes to the creation of a criminological imagination. Furthermore, the module uses this basis to introduce students to theoretical discussions that critique and question the role and practices of the main criminal justice institutions in England and Wales in relation to historical perspectives, equality, space and place and social justice, more broadly.

    • CCJS1119 21st Century Criminological Issues

      The module introduces students to the global challenges of crime and crime control. It does so by drawing on contextual examples of contemporary developments to the landscape of crime, deviancy, social problems, globalisation and criminal justice. Students will assess the strengths and weakness of criminological approaches to understanding these examples.

    • IRL100 Imagining World Order

      This module introduces the essential terms, concepts and processes of international relations analysis. It describes the main features of the international system since its evolution from the Treaty of Westphalia, continuities and discontinuities with earlier international systems, plus the move from state sovereignty to global governance in the contemporary context. It also introduces the primary theories of international relations analysis, whilst putting their emergence and development into historical context.

    • IRL102 International Relations Since 1945

      This module provides an introduction to the historical development of the international political system since 1945. It provides a crucial background to the major processes and actors that have shaped the contemporary international system.

  • Year 2
  • In your second year, you’ll broaden your skills, from learning how to assess, collect and use statistics, surveys, interviews and observational studies in researching crime and criminal justice, to examining theories of criminology alongside contemporary social, communications and cultural theories, urban studies, international relations and zemiology. You’ll delve into social justice and global politics and have the opportunity go on an exchange to the Czech Republic, Poland, Canada or the USA.

    Core modules
    • CCJS2115 Crime, Theory and Culture

      This module examines contemporary criminological theory and scholarship, providing a critical analysis of new directions at the forefront of the discipline. The module covers the intersections of criminology with contemporary social theory, communications theory, urban studies, international relations, cultural theory and zemiology.

    • CCJS2120 Researching Crime and Criminal Justice

      This module describes and assesses the reliability and validity of the different methodologies and sources of information utilised in criminal justice research, focusing especially upon the collection and use of official statistics, surveys, interviews and observational studies. The module also provides practical experience for students in using specialist quantitative and qualitative computer programmes for analysing data.

    • CCJS2121 Policing and Community Safety

      This module affords students an opportunity to explore, in depth, the structures, practices and key issues facing modern policing and community safety in the UK. It focuses particularly upon the police service, but also upon developments in plural policing, including the expansion of partnership policing.

    • CCJS2125 Prisons, 'Probation' and Penality

      This module draws on theories of penality to analyse and evaluate penal policy and practice. In particular it critically examines contemporary issues, developments and debates relating to the use of imprisonment and community sentences for adult offenders.

    • CCJSP200 Preparation for Work Placement

      This module is aimed at students who have elected to undertake a placement at the end of stage 2 of their degree. On completion of the placement year students will return to sit stage 3. It is designed to build on skills learned in stage 1 and helps students in their search for a placement, and in their preparation for the placement itself.

    • IRL200 Understanding Global Politics

      This module provides an introduction to the main authors and debates in contemporary IR theory, from mainstream theories to critical approaches. The module pays particular attention to the historical context of each approach, and the relationship between theory and practice in contemporary global politics.

    Optional modules
    • IRL201 International Security Studies

      This module considers the issue of security in contemporary international relations. It examines a variety of different security concepts from deterrence and the security dilemma to arms control, peacekeeping, terrorism, regional security complexes and governance. It then seeks to relate these to practical examples from world politics.

    • IRL203 International Relations of the Developing World

      This module embraces both theoretical and empirical approaches to understanding development issues and policies, at national, international and multilateral scale. The approach taken is deliberately inter-disciplinary, incorporating historical, economic, political and social perspectives. The module also uses case studies based in Africa, Latin America and Asia to illustrate and provide context for the discussion of various developmental concerns. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding the development policy arena; how it is framed and constituted; the power relations between actors; and the impact on human communities and their environments.

  • Optional placement year
  • You have the option to take a placement year in the third year of study. 

  • Final year
  • In your final year, you’ll design and implement your own research project to produce your dissertation, working independently with the support of a member of our academic team. You’ll discover more about international relations in operation and opt for modules from refugee studies to maritime security. You’ll also have the option of choosing from a variety of modules in your areas of interest, from anti-social behaviour to law, literature and film.

Every undergraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the course aims, the course structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

The following programme specification represents the latest course structure and may be subject to change:

Programme specification BSc Criminology and Criminal Justice Studies 6738

The modules shown for this course are those currently being studied by our students, or are proposed new modules. Please note that programme structures and individual modules are subject to amendment from time to time as part of the University’s curriculum enrichment programme and in line with changes in the University’s policies and requirements.

Entry requirements

UCAS tariff

88 - 104

A levels
88-104 points including a minimum of two A levels. Excluding general studies.

BTEC
18 Unit BTEC Extended Diploma: MMM–DMM in any subject.

BTEC National Diploma modules
If you hold a BTEC qualification it is vital that you provide our Admissions team with details of the exact modules you have studied as part of the BTEC. Without this information we may be unable to process your application quickly and you could experience significant delays in the progress of your application to study with us. Please explicitly state the full list of modules within your qualification at the time of application.

Access
Pass a named Access to HE Diploma in any subject with at least 33 credits at merit/distinction.

IB
24-26 overall to include 4 at any subject at Higher Level. English and Maths accepted within: Higher Level = 4 Standard Level = 5.

GCSE
All applicants must have GCSE (or equivalent) mathematics and English at grade C or above.

Other
14-19 Diplomas: accepted – please enquire. Other combinations and non-A level qualifications also considered.

Short of the entry requirements for this course? Don’t worry you may be eligible for a foundation year to prepare you for possible entry onto this course for the following year.


For a full list of all acceptable qualifications please refer to our tariff glossary.

Fees, costs and funding

EU applicants should refer to our dedicated Brexit webpage for details of the implications of the UK’s plans to leave the European Union.

New Student 2019 2020
Home/EU £9,250 To be confirmed
International £13,400 To be confirmed
Part time (Home/EU) To be confirmed To be confirmed
Full time fees shown are per annum. Part time fees shown are per a number of credits. Please note that fees are reviewed on an annual basis. Fees and the conditions that apply to them shown in the prospectus are correct at the time of going to print. Fees shown on the web are the most up to date but are still subject to change in exceptional circumstances.

Undergraduate scholarships for international students

To reward outstanding achievement the University of Plymouth offers scholarship schemes to help towards funding your studies.

Find out whether you are eligible and how you can apply

Additional costs

This course is delivered by the Faculty of Business and more details of any additional costs associated with the faculty's courses are listed on the following page: Faculty of Business additional costs.

How to apply

All applications for undergraduate courses are made through UCAS (Universities and Colleges Admissions Service). 

UCAS will ask for the information contained in the box at the top of this course page including the UCAS course code and the institution code. 

To apply for this course and for more information about submitting an application including application deadline dates, please visit the UCAS website.

Support is also available to overseas students applying to the University from our International Office via our how to apply webpage or email international-admissions@plymouth.ac.uk.

International relations

International relations is about matters of life and death - not just for soldiers and citizens lying in the path of war but for the whole human race.

Studying BSc (Hons) International Relations with the University of Plymouth offers you a fresh, contemporary approach.

View the BSc (Hons) International Relations course page

Student societies

Our societies offer you the chance to expand your knowledge of the criminal justice system.

The Howard League student group and Crimsoc run events, invite guest speakers and arrange volunteering opportunities.

Learn more about our societies

Justice Works

Justice Works encompasses a range of activities within the Law School that aim to promote social justice.

Find out more about the work-based learning and volunteering opportunities open to you.

Discover more

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