School of Law, Criminology and Government

BSc (Hons) Law with Criminology and Criminal Justice Studies

Are you ready to make your mark? If you’ve studied a foundation course in law with criminology and criminal justice (CCJS) at one of our partner colleges and want to obtain a law degree, BSc (Hons) Law with CCJS will prepare you for a career in the legal or criminal justice professions and beyond. Develop a breadth of transferable skills, and benefit from our focus on teaching law in the ‘real’ world.

*Please note: the first two years of the degree are only available through the University’s partner colleges which provide you with a foundation degree in law, enabling you to join the third year of our law, criminology and criminal justice programmes to obtain the BSc law degree.

Apply through Clearing for September 2019

Clearing is the last opportunity to achieve a place this September.

If you are yet to apply to the University of Plymouth you can pre-register for Clearing to receive priority treatment on results day.

Apply through Clearing

Key features

  • Choose from a range of relevant third year law and CCJS options from the LLB (Hons) Law programmes and BSc (Hons) Law with Criminology and Criminal Justice Studies.
  • Top-up your degree with a one year Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) before applying for the solicitors’ Legal Practice Course or the Barristers’ Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC).
  • Benefit from working with a faculty of highly qualified law and CCJS staff who provide a great mix of research-informed and practice-led teaching.
  • Pursue further criminological study – we offer an MSc in Criminology at Plymouth Law School
  • Take part in relevant work experience and research in areas such as criminal justice, employment and family law via our Law Clinic.

*Please note: the first two years of the degree are only available through Plymouth University’s partner colleges which provide you with a foundation degree in law, enabling you to join the third year of our law, criminology and criminal justice programmes to obtain the BSc law degree.

Course details

  • Overview
  • You will develop the appropriate analytical and research techniques required to examine the fields of law and criminal justice, and can choose from optional modules including criminal law, comparative youth justice and professional knowledge of policing. You will also complete a module focussing on career planning and employability, and have the option to produce a substantial dissertation on a legal or legally related area, which may be set in the context of criminology and criminal justice.

    Core modules
    • LAWGEAR3 Graduate Employability and Achievement Record

      A module designed to continue the process of development of self-assessment and reflection with particular focus on career planning and employability post- graduation.

    Optional modules
    • CCJS3156 Criminology of War

      This module explores the issue of crime in the context of war and conflict. Theoretical and conceptual understandings of crime, violence, victimisation and justice will be used to interrogate acts considered as war crimes. The module will address the history of crimes committed in war and will critically explore international criminal justice responses.

    • CCJS3165 Crime, Punishment and Social Change

      This module responds to a growing criminological interest in the history of crime and punishment. It examines how attitudes towards crime and the punishments used have changed and developed since the 18th century. It introduces students to historical research methods by utilising both digital and local archives, and encourages them to research aspects from crime history and critically compare and contrast them with contemporary perspectives and criminological literature.

    • CCJS3166 Digital Crime and Deviancy

      This module explores the issue of crime related to digital technology, in particular the Internet. It will consider how digital technology normalises and legitimises criminal activity, with a particular focus on harassment, sexual crimes and activities related to children and young people. The module will also consider approaches to tackling digital crime, considering legislative approaches contrasted against human rights issues.

    • CCJS3170 Deviant Leisure

      This module explores contemporary developments within the study of deviant leisure, offering a theoretically informed understanding of key issues at the forefront of the discipline. Students will have the opportunity to study the changing nature of criminology¿s engagement with leisure against a backdrop of global consumer capitalism.

    • CCJS3171 International Human Rights and 'Children First' Youth Justice

      This module compares and contrasts youth justice policies and processes in a range of different countries. In particular, it analyses the impact of socio-political and cultural factors on youth justice debates from a comparative international perspective. This includes an analysis of the extent to which countries comply with international human rights standards.

    • CCJS3172 Critical Hate Studies

      This module will present the problem of `hate crime¿ to students by identifying legislation, policy and practice that has been framed within its context. It will deconstruct the notion of hate crime and provide a critical reflection on the notion of `hate¿ and its manifestations in late modernity.

    • LAW3222 Dissertation

      The production of a substantial dissertation (12,000-15,000 words) on a legal or legally related area with content and form determined by the student. For the LLB with CCJS or Business the dissertation will be set in context.

    • LAW3223 Work-based Action Research

      A module in which BSc Law with Business or CCJS students apply legal skills (including research) and knowledge by undertaking practical legal research as part of their work-based learning.

    • LAW3226 Company Law

      The module considers the key legal concepts, principles and policies relating to business organisation and corporate governance.

    • LAW3228 Employment Law

      This final year elective module provides students with knowledge of a specialist area of law, namely Employment Law, whilst also continuing to offer development of general legal skills.

    • LAW3229 Environmental Law

      The module provides an examination of key themes in environmental law, with a focus on the generation, application and enforcement of this law within a critical and applied context.

    • LAW3230 Family Law

      This module will examine the principles of family law from both theoretical and practical perspectives.

    • LAW3233 Commercial Law

      In outline this module covers elements of commercial law, trading, commercial relations and practice. It includes aspects of commercial transactions, agency, regulation enforcement and remedies.

    • LAW3237 Intellectual Property and Information Law

      This module focuses on the law and concepts of intellectual property, examining in addition related legal themes of information access, dissemination and control.

    • LAW3238 Sex, Power and Legal Control

      This module examines how law and society controls and regulates sexual behaviour and conduct and why and how it criminalises and punishes certain activities and sexual expression. In particular it will focus on the enactment and implementation of laws relating to sexual autonomy and sex crime and examine how these are practically operationalized within the criminal justice process. Within this context the impact upon those affected by such legal regulation is also examined.

    • LAW3239 Cybercrime: Issues and Regulation

    • LAW3242 Criminal law

      "This module provides in depth examination of basic principles and concepts of criminal law, an introduction to modes of participation, and detailed analysis of selected offences and defences. The module fulfils the professional requirements of the Law Society and Bar Council. "

    • LAW3244 Jurisprudence: law, society and justice

      This module follows jurisprudential inquiries into themes and topics relating to the concept of law and the intersection between law and society. It analyses key ideas and theories on the development of legal concepts and regulatory frameworks. It adopts a broad range of theoretical perspectives from sociology, cultural studies and economics to examine the phenomenon of law, providing a platform for developing rich interdisciplinary discussion and reflection.

    • LAW3249 Law, Literature and the Screen

      To introduce students to fictional representations of the legal order in prose, film and TV, and to examine the inter-connections between law, literature and the screen.

    • MAR321 Carriage of Goods by Sea

      The study of the law relating to charterparties and bill of lading contracts, and liability for pollution.

    • MAR329 Marine Insurance and Admiralty Law

      The study of the law relating to Marine Insurance, including General Average and Admiralty Law.

Every undergraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the course aims, the course structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

The following programme specification represents the latest course structure and may be subject to change:

BSc Law with CCJS programme specification 5075

The modules shown for this course are those currently being studied by our students, or are proposed new modules. Please note that programme structures and individual modules are subject to amendment from time to time as part of the University’s curriculum enrichment programme and in line with changes in the University’s policies and requirements.

Entry requirements

In order to join this course, you'll need the successful completion of a foundation degree in law or an equivalent two-year higher-education qualification.

English language requirements

Please contact the Admissions Team.

Fees, costs and funding

EU applicants should refer to our dedicated Brexit webpage for details of the implications of the UK’s plans to leave the European Union.

New Student 2018 2019
Home/EU £9,250 £9,250
International £13,000 £13,400
Part time (Home/EU) To be confirmed To be confirmed
Full time fees shown are per annum. Part time fees shown are per a number of credits. Please note that fees are reviewed on an annual basis. Fees and the conditions that apply to them shown in the prospectus are correct at the time of going to print. Fees shown on the web are the most up to date but are still subject to change in exceptional circumstances.

Undergraduate scholarships for international students

To reward outstanding achievement the University of Plymouth offers scholarship schemes to help towards funding your studies.

Find out whether you are eligible and how you can apply

Additional costs

This course is delivered by the Faculty of Business and more details of any additional costs associated with the faculty's courses are listed on the following page: Faculty of Business additional costs.

How to apply

For further information and to apply to this course, please contact the institution's admissions team directly.

Plymouth Law Clinic

The Law School is committed to giving you the opportunity to put the law into practice.

The Law Clinic offers advice and representation to real clients and in many cases, makes a tangible difference to their lives.

Read more about our Law Clinic

Student success stories

As well as benefitting from excellent teaching and unrivalled opportunities to learn in the workplace, becoming a Plymouth law student also means you can join one of the most active societies of its kind in the country.

Find out more about the Plymouth Student Law Society

Faculty of Business Potential High Achievers Scheme

We recognise that our students are the future business leaders of the world. We know that our applicants will thrive in this environment, and we want to ensure our best applicants believe in this.

We will be contacting applicants who are not only on course to achieve top marks but who have an outstanding personal statement. 

As recognition of the potential we think an applicant has we will then change their offer to unconditional. Your place at the University of Plymouth will then be confirmed and you can go ahead and make arrangements for your accommodation and move to Plymouth in September.

Find out all the details

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