ADA Public Programme 2018-19: Strange Ecologies
  • Jill Craigie Cinema, Roland Levinsky Building

  • Jill Craigie Cinema, Roland Levinsky Building

  • Jill Craigie Cinema, Roland Levinsky Building

  • Jill Craigie Cinema, Roland Levinsky Building

  • Jill Craigie Cinema, Roland Levinsky Building

Save event

The School of Art, Design and Architecture (ADA) at the University of Plymouth presents its public programme, with talks by Ayesha Hameed, Khadija von Zinnenburg Carroll, Vermeir and Heiremans, Neil Cummings, Erika Balsom, Sonia Boyce, Matthew Fuller and Olga Goriunova, Christian Ulrik Andersen and Søren Pold.

“We need new social and aesthetic practices, new practices of the Self in relation to the other, to the foreign, the strange – a whole programme that seems far removed from current concerns. And yet, ultimately, we will only escape from the major crises of our era through the articulation of:
- A nascent subjectivity
- A constantly mutating socius
- An environment in the process of being reinvented.”
We take this quote from Félix Guattari’s Three Ecologies (first published in 1989) as a starting point to explore the interconnected networks of mind, society and the environment now, and in turn to reflect the research strengths of the University in marine studies, cultural heritage and health. 

The ADA Public Programme thus explores how transversal eco-aesthetic practices can respond to the damaging effects of integrated world capitalism (e.g. the increase of mental health and stress-related disorders; the rise of right-wing nationalism and fundamentalisms; ecological crisis on a global scale, climate change and natural resource depletion). Invited speakers respond to ecologies in their widest sense: to counter the pervasive atmosphere of inaction, and propose new social and aesthetic imaginaries.

All talks are FREE and open to all. The talks are organised in collaboration with The Arts Institute, The Atlantic Project and The Box. Please contact Geoff Cox (geoffrey.cox@plymouth.ac.uk) for further information.

Tuesday 4 December, 18:00

  •  Neil Cummings - ArtFutures. Organised in collaboration with The Box.
Through an account of a series of projects, artist Neil Cummings will sketch a political economy of art, and suggest creative, economic, ecological and social scenarios that could nurture vibrant artistic practices and prototypes for arts futures.

Neil Cummings was born in Wales and lives in London, he is a professor at Chelsea College of Arts and on the editorial board of Documents of Contemporary Art.

Thursday 17 January, 18:00

  • Erika Balsom - An Oceanic Feeling
What is oceanic feeling? For Sigmund Freud, it is the sensation of an unbreakable bond between oneself and the outside world, a quasi-sublime state in which the integrity of the self is lost, or at least compromised, in a feeling of limitlessness, unboundedness, and interconnectedness. This presentation takes Freud’s metaphor literally, returning this sense of “belonging inseparably to the external world as a whole” to its aquatic origins to explore how the ocean forges connections between people, between communities, and between the human and nonhuman. If will drifts idiosyncratically through the history of cinematic representations of the sea, from Hollywood to documentary and the avant-garde, in search of reflections on what it means to belong to the whole of a world in our time of ecological, humanitarian, and political emergency.

Erika Balsom is a senior lecturer in Film Studies and Liberal Arts at King’s College London.

Thursday 7 February, 18:00

  • Sonia Boyce - title tbcOrganised in collaboration with The Box.
Abstract to follow.

Sonia Boyce MBE RA lives and works in London and is currently Professor of Black Art and Design at University of the Arts London.

Friday 15 February, 18:00

  • Olga Goriunova and Matthew Fuller - Irresolvability
Irresolvable problems are those to which none of the answers available are the right ones. Irresolvability is the structural incapacity to sort out a problem, to be in a state of inhabiting a problem that both consists of you and that is outwith you. It is a means of establishing a certain kind of economy of deterrence, dysfunction, a generalised condition of sludginess. Irresolvability names the condition in which the structuring incapacity of action of strategic thought becomes, by means of related technologies, economic and organisational forms and processes of subjectivation a part of everyday infrastructure of feeling.  Born in the game theoretical exuberance of the cold war, irresolvability names the rationalised technique, inaugurated at Hiroshima, of rendering a problem beyond reasonable choice. It thus establishes a connection between ecological obliteration and the prohibition of thought by means of reason.

Olga Goriunova is Reader at the department of Media Arts, Royal Holloway University of London.
Matthew Fuller is Professor of Cultural Studies at Goldsmiths, University of London.

Thursday 14 March, 18:00

  • Christian Ulrik Andersen and Søren Pold - Metainterface 
The computer interface is both omnipresent and invisible, at once integrated into everyday objects and characterized by hidden exchanges of information between objects. With the current spread of mobile devices, embedded sensors, cloud services, and data capture, a new interface paradigm, the metainterface, arises where data and software disappear from our devices and into the global cloud. The metainterface indicates, that the interface has become more abstract, generalized, but also spatialized in the sense of being ubiquitous, mobile, urban and related to the things of our environment. The metainterface is a paradigm, an industry (e.g. Amazon, Google, Apple, Spotify, Netflix, Facebook, etc.) and an art/design practice, which calls for new understandings of art, culture and IT. In our book The Metainterface (MIT Press, 2018), we have developed such understandings in relation to art, literature and culture, and we will present some of this in this talk with a focus on realism and design.

Christian Ulrik Andersen is Associate Professor at Aarhus University, Department of Digital Design and Information Studies.
Søren Bro Pold is Associate Professor, Information Science, Aarhus University.

View the longer abstracts and biographies below.






PDecember 2018N
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
26 27 28 29 30 1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 1 2 3 4 5 6

Today's events

Further details

Neil Cummings - ArtFutures

Through an account of a series of projects, artist Neil Cummings will sketch a political economy of art, and suggest creative, economic, ecological and social scenarios that could nurture vibrant artistic practices and prototypes for arts futures.

Neil Cummings was born in Wales and lives in London, he is a professor at Chelsea College of Arts and on the editorial board of Documents of Contemporary Art. As an artist Neil has worked with museums, banks, galleries, archives, auction houses, broadcasters, enthusiasts, places of education and department stores in locations as diverse as London, New York, Geneva, Cairo and Warsaw. He has explored the entanglements of art and capital in 19th century Manchester, linked the Tate and Bank of England through gifts and their subsequent debt, constructed possible futures for museums and impersonated a famous art dealer. These projects, although diverse, have consistently engaged with the cultural forces that designate and exhibit art, and the increasingly devolved experience of art, to its publics.

Erika Balsom - An Oceanic Feeling

What is oceanic feeling? For Sigmund Freud, it is the sensation of an unbreakable bond between oneself and the outside world, a quasi-sublime state in which the integrity of the self is lost, or at least compromised, in a feeling of limitlessness, unboundedness, and interconnectedness. This presentation takes Freud’s metaphor literally, returning this sense of “belonging inseparably to the external world as a whole” to its aquatic origins to explore how the ocean forges connections between people, between communities, and between the human and nonhuman. If will drifts idiosyncratically through the history of cinematic representations of the sea, from Hollywood to documentary and the avant-garde, in search of reflections on what it means to belong to the whole of a world in our time of ecological, humanitarian, and political emergency.

The talk will be followed by a screening of La Monde du Silence (1956).

Erika Balsom is a senior lecturer in Film Studies and Liberal Arts at King’s College London. Her latest book, After Uniqueness: A History of Film and Video Art in Circulation, was published by Columbia University Press in 2017. She is the author of Exhibiting Cinema in Contemporary Art (2013), the co-editor of Documentary Across Disciplines (2016), and a frequent contributor to Artforum and Sight and Sound. In 2017, she was the international curator in residence at the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery/Len Lye Centre, New Zealand, resulting in the 2018 screening programme and publication An Oceanic Feeling: Cinema and the Sea.

Sonia Boyce - title TBC

Abstract to follow.

Sonia Boyce MBE RA lives and works in London and is fascinated by 'what people do when they come together'. Her early work addressed issues of race and gender in the media and in day-to-day life. These themes were expressed through large pastel drawings and photographic collages. Since then, her work has shifted materially and conceptually by incorporating a variety of media such as film, print, drawing, installation and sound. Her recent work also brings performers and audiences into sharper focus as an improvisational part of the artwork, demonstrating how cultural differences might be articulated, mediated and enjoyed. Boyce’s significant exhibitions include All the World’s Futures, 56th Venice Biennale, Arsenale and Giardini (2015); We move in her way, ICA, London (2017) and her mid-career retrospective at Manchester Art Gallery in 2018. She is represented in the permanent collections of Arts Council England and Tate Modern, London. In 2007, Boyce was awarded an MBE in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List for services to the arts. She is currently Professor of Black Art and Design at University of the Arts London.

Olga Goriunova and Matthew Fuller - Irresolvability

Irresolvable problems are those to which none of the answers available are the right ones. Irresolvability is the structural incapacity to sort out a problem, to be in a state of inhabiting a problem that both consists of you and that is outwith you. It is a means of establishing a certain kind of economy of deterrence, dysfunction, a generalised condition of sludginess. Irresolvability names the condition in which the structuring incapacity of action of strategic thought becomes, by means of related technologies, economic and organisational forms and processes of subjectivation a part of everyday infrastructure of feeling.  Born in the game theoretical exuberance of the cold war, irresolvability names the rationalised technique, inaugurated at Hiroshima, of rendering a problem beyond reasonable choice. It thus establishes a connection between ecological obliteration and the prohibition of thought by means of reason.

This state of impossible choice becomes foundational to the modern world, but is one different to the choice of Sartre or of Kierkegaard. Gregory Bateson presents us with the form of the schizogenic double bind to articulate this condition and, reflecting on some particularly dark experiments on dolphins, notes that it is a formal condition that may be replicated across species.

But this condition is also that of a generalised proliferation of irresolvable problems, a world of debt that comes before persons and the fractal proliferation of deterrence that dissolves futures, and in which formalisms derived from the techniques of deterrence become structuring devices that saturate everyday life.  In his regard, the paper develops a new reading of the work of Hayek in his work on economic automata as part of a generalised and nonlinear infrastructure of irresolvability.

Olga Goriunova is Reader at the department of Media Arts, Royal Holloway University of London. She is the author of Art Platforms (Routledge 2012) and, with Matthew Fuller, of Bleak Joys (Minnesota 2019). She has edited numerous volumes, including Fun and Software (Bloomsbury 2014).

Matthew Fuller is author of books including How to Sleep, the art biology and culture of unconsciousness and is Professor of Cultural Studies at Goldsmiths, University of London.

Søren Pold and Christian Ulrik Andersen - The Metainterface: Critical Realism and Design

The computer interface is both omnipresent and invisible, at once integrated into everyday objects and characterized by hidden exchanges of information between objects. With the current spread of mobile devices, embedded sensors, cloud services, and data capture, a new interface paradigm, the metainterface, arises where data and software disappear from our devices and into the global cloud. The metainterface indicates, that the interface has become more abstract, generalized, but also spatialized in the sense of being ubiquitous, mobile, urban and related to the things of our environment. The metainterface is a paradigm, an industry (e.g. Amazon, Google, Apple, Spotify, Netflix, Facebook, etc.) and an art/design practice, which calls for new understandings of art, culture and IT. In our book The Metainterface (MIT Press, 2018), we have developed such understandings in relation to art, literature and culture, and we will present some of this in this talk with a focus on realism and design. We will argue, that a realism of the metainterface is needed to understand what we see (e.g. the data, tools, operations, transactions) combined with how we see it (the metainterface and its software, networks and executions), including how it sees us (how the user/users are captured, datafied, profiled, computed or ‘executed’). In other ways we need a ‘way of seeing’ that goes beyond the visual and integrates the metainterface and its effects. This realism will be discussed with examples from software art and critical interface design.

Christian Ulrik Andersen is Associate Professor at Aarhus University, Department of Digital Design and Information Studies. Inspired by network and software culture his research addresses the intersection between software and cultural performativity. In particular, he addresses the notion of »interface criticism« as performed in a variety of design and arts practices. The outcome is found in various articles and books, including The Metainterface – The Art of Platforms, Cities and Clouds MIT Press 2018 (co-authored with Søren Pold) as well as a number of projects that address issues of tactical and free research; including the online journal APRJA, together with Geoff Cox, and a Peer-Reviewed Newspaper in collaboration with transmediale festival for art and digital culture, Berlin.

Søren Bro Pold is Associate Professor, Information Science, Aarhus University. He has published on digital and media aesthetics – from the 19th century panorama to the interface in its different forms, e.g. on electronic literature, net art, software art, creative software, urban, mobile and cloud interfaces, activism, surveillance culture and digital culture. His main research field is interface criticism which discusses the role and the development of the interface for art, literature, aesthetics, culture and IT. Together with Christian Ulrik Andersen he edited the anthology Interface Criticism (2011) and published The Metainterface – The Art of Platforms, Cities and Clouds (MIT Press, 2018). In relation to electronic literature, he has collaborated with libraries in several projects, e.g. on developing the installation The Poetry Machine, which has been showed at many libraries across Denmark and internationally.
Event photography and video
Please be aware that some of the University of Plymouth's public events may be attended by University photographers and videographers, for capturing content to be used in University online and offline marketing and promotional materials, for example webpages, brochures or leaflets. If for whatever reason, you or a member of your group, do not wish to be photographed, please make yourself known to staff working at the event on arrival or to the photographer.